I WANT 2 KNOE

What was your experience?   Can you tell me more?   To get to the root of what it was like, for me, to grow up with mentally ill parents, and to find out what it was like for others.

"No story is a straight line. The geometry of a human life is too imperfect and complex, too distorted by the laughter of time and the bewildering intricacies of fate to admit the straight line into its system of laws."
Pat Conroy, Beach Music: A Novel (via larmoyante)

(Source: larmoyante, via incisio)

— 2 years ago with 485 notes
"I am good at walking away. Rejection teaches you how to reject."
Jeanette Winterson, Weight: The Myth of Atlas and Heracles (via rachelhaines)

(Source: larmoyante, via rachelhaines)

— 2 years ago with 1041 notes

fosterhood:

In hindsight, maybe I should have at least spoken to the police? Of all the times for the car service to send a black van… I barely got the sliding door open before Jacket’s mom threw Jacket at me and shouted to the driver “Go! Go! Go!!!”. Have I mentioned how compelling she is? The driver didn’t ask any questions either- he just put the pedal to the metal. Definitely an ‘I LOVE NY moment’.

— 2 years ago with 27 notes


PuurAnders inventive photo art.

(via etsy)

— 2 years ago with 366 notes
humansofnewyork:

‎”My brother and I moved to New York when I was 12 years old. We’d been living with my grandmother in Philadelphia, but she said it was time to go live with my mother. We didn’t want to go. When we got off the bus, I remember my brother grabbed my hand and said: ‘Watch out! The buildings are going to fall on us!’ We’d never seen such tall buildings. When he got to my mother’s apartment building in Harlem, I was shocked. Most of the doors were open. There were bums lying on the floor of the hall. I remember thinking: ‘This can’t be where we are going to live!’ I think the happiest moment of my life was when I was finally able to move out of Harlem.”

humansofnewyork:

‎”My brother and I moved to New York when I was 12 years old. We’d been living with my grandmother in Philadelphia, but she said it was time to go live with my mother. We didn’t want to go. When we got off the bus, I remember my brother grabbed my hand and said: ‘Watch out! The buildings are going to fall on us!’ We’d never seen such tall buildings. When he got to my mother’s apartment building in Harlem, I was shocked. Most of the doors were open. There were bums lying on the floor of the hall. I remember thinking: ‘This can’t be where we are going to live!’ I think the happiest moment of my life was when I was finally able to move out of Harlem.”

(Source: humansofnewyork)

— 2 years ago with 262 notes
"One more thing to worry about: the better Autocorrect gets, the more we will come to rely on it. It’s happening already. People who yesterday unlearned arithmetic will soon forget how to spell. One by one we are outsourcing our mental functions to the global prosthetic brain."
— 2 years ago with 58 notes
"See the light in others, and treat them as if that is all you see."
— 2 years ago with 2955 notes
humansofnewyork:

‎”My father has Asperger’s, so it’s always been very difficult to connect with him emotionally. Then a few years ago I was reading Truman Capote’s ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms,’ and there’s this scene where the main character prays to know his father. And when he’s done praying, the chapter ends: ‘And in this moment, like a swift intake of breath, the rain came.’”

humansofnewyork:

‎”My father has Asperger’s, so it’s always been very difficult to connect with him emotionally. Then a few years ago I was reading Truman Capote’s ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms,’ and there’s this scene where the main character prays to know his father. And when he’s done praying, the chapter ends: ‘And in this moment, like a swift intake of breath, the rain came.’”

(Source: humansofnewyork)

— 2 years ago with 754 notes